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Weaving Basics: warping your Warp&Weave weave-set and start weaving. Back to overview

WARP & WEAVE

by meaningful crafts

How do you warp your Warp&Weave loom? And how do you start the Weaving process afterwards? In part two of our series about weaving we explain how you warp your loom and how you can start weaving!

Tags: #warp&weave #weaving #DYI #how-to #instructions #W&Wpart2

Necessary to start weaving:

Weaving Basics instructional videos:

Are you ready to start Weaving?

First determine how wide you want your project to be. Based on that count how many “teeth” you want to skip on both the left and right side of your bottom and top loom side. You then know your starting and end teeth.

Make a loop in your warping thread and pull it over your starting teeth on the bottom side. Bring the warping thread to the top side and go over the top side, around the teeth and back to the bottom-side next teeth. Keep repeating these steps until you have warped the entire width of your desired project. Stop on the opposite side from where you started (so top side) and finish with a single loop around your end teeth.

Now you have to take out the slack in your warp. We do this by strumming the warp thread in a specific way.

Put your finger under the first thread and push upwards towards yourself. While keeping the tension on the thread you do the same with the second thread while slowly releasing the first thread. This way the slack gets transferred to the second thread. You repeat this for every thread (so from second to third and so on). When you reach the end of your warp you loosen the loop, and make a new one with the tighter warp.

You repeat the step above a few times until your warp thread is nicely tight.

Try to get the warp on such tension that the loom does not get pulled askew but where the thread feels like it gives a firm tension when you push it to the side.

When you are satisfied you finish the tightening by making a double loop around the last teeth to fasten it.

 

Take a long piece of white paper or cardboard and weave it on the bottom side through your warp (you go one up, one under on each next thread). This piece of paper ensures that you keep enough space on the bottom to close your weaving work at the end step and provided you something to push your weaving threads to in the weaving step.

Optionally you an do the same on the top part of your loom. This gives you extra space to attach your weaving work to a stick or a hanger after you have finished.

Than, you weave in a similar fashion, but starting on one thread later, the weaving sword through the warp. So if you started with your paper with the first thread under, than when you start weaving with your sword you start with that thread on top.

Having the sword in the loom in this way allows you to “open” the threads by turning the sword sideways. This allows you to easily go between the threads with your weaving needle and weavethread.

It is important to weave in an arch. This ensures that you keep enough slack in your weaving thead which makes that your weave project does not turn into an hour-glass-shape.

Then you push the woven thread down towards you with your sword or with the weaving comb.

Remove the sword and weave it back in, starting again from a different warp thread than you wove over last time (so if you finished on top of the warp thread, you start under it this time). Repeat the steps to weave more!

One of the nicest applications of this loom is weaving with woolroving. You can do this exactly as in the last step. Ends of woolroving, or breaks in your roving you can easily attach into itself by pushing it around a warpthread back into the woolroving.

From here the real adventure starts, you are now ready to start weaving, but there is a plethora of patterns, techniques and materials to discover!

We really like seeing what you have done with Warp&Weave so please share your progress with us on our instagram!

If you want to see how to assemble the loom check out Part one – how to assemble my Warp&Weave loom